How to succeed in backlogs without really trying

First, two disclaimers. 1) The ICO’s previous FOI backlog was disgraceful, and it developed on Richard Thomas’s watch. Chris Graham and his staff deserve great credit for trying to kill it off. The fact that an organisation can no longer make a decision knowing that they won’t answer for it for two years is a […]

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The Cabinet Office & FOI, A Retrospective, 2010-2011

As you know, FOI is under threat from a disparate coalition of interest groups, all of whom profess strong support for the idea of FOI and transparency in principle, but who object strongly when it applies to them. As I have already blogged, it’s the FOI equivalent of saying ‘I’m not racist but..” With friends […]

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Carry On Motorman

My next blog post was supposed to be something a bit different, but I’m waiting for someone to respond to a complaint I’ve made before completing it. In the meantime, all I have is more Motorman ICO material. The muddle over the legal advice I wanted that they didn’t have and the legal advice they did […]

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Today’s post is brought to you by the letters I, C and O

Previously on the 2040 Information Law Blog… Last September, a former Investigator from the Information Commissioner’s office (subsequently identified as Alec Owens) gave an interview to the Independent, in which he condemned his erstwhile employer for bottling the decision to prosecute journalists who had employed the private investigator Steve Whittamore. The Deputy Information Commissioner, David […]

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Where did I put that thing?

There was an unusually frank admission in the Register’s recent report (http://tinyurl.com/3k3j3xv) on their home-grown email SNAFU. Roughly 3000 people received an email containing the names and email addresses of roughly 45000 people because, in the Register’s words “The two-stage send process that is the norm for all of our mailers was over-looked because someone […]

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ICO is wrong on back-ups

A bout of insomnia drove me to the laptop, but I was too tired to do anything constructive. After some idle Guardian and Telegraph browsing, I gravitated to WhatDoTheyKnow – depending on your role, you may see it as a vital tool for democracy, or a sphincter-clenching irritant. From my lowly perspective in the private […]

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