Less than ideal

Last week, Stephen Lee, an academic and former fundraiser was reported as having attacked the Information Commissioner’s Office for their interpretation of direct marketing at a fundraising conference. It was, he said “outrageous” that the Commissioner’s direct marketing guidance stated that any advertising or marketing material that promoted the aims and ideals of a not-for-profit […]

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The (Mayoral) Race Card

As regular readers of this blog will doubtless be aware, the Data Protection Act is based on the idea that all uses of personal data have to be justified. Specific conditions are set out for both ordinary data (names, addresses, financial data) while additional conditions are listed for sensitive data (political opinions and ethnicity amongst […]

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The Gamekeeper’s Fear of the Penalty

Amongst the hype over the end of negotiations over the new EU Data Protection Regulation, one theme kept emerging again and again: Big Penalties. It’s understandable that people might want to focus on it. The UK goes from a maximum possible penalty of £500,000 to one of just under £15,000,000 (at today’s Euro conversion rate) or even 4% […]

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Consenting adults

Around two months ago, the Etherington Review into charity fundraising and governance published a series of recommendations about the way the sector should be run. The most eye-catching and ridiculous is the Fundraising Preference Service, which I wrote about at the time. The reaction to the FPS from charities has been almost universally negative, with a series […]

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FPS FFS

Following some fine investigative work, the Daily Mail was today content to declare “VICTORY” in its battle against rogue fundraisers and their equally shameless charity employers. The Mail’s apparent triumph is the publication of a government approved review by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations and chaired by Sir Stuart Etherington, the NCVO’s Chief Executive. […]

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An impossible thing before breakfast

The Information Commissioner, Christopher Graham, made one of his occasional appearances on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme this morning. He was there to talk about the Daily Mail’s blistering investigation into the call centres used by charities to raise money over the phone, often with high-pressure sales tactics and abundant breaches of PECR. As regular […]

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Hunting the snark

There isn’t any legal requirement to publish a clear public link, explaining how to make an FOI request, but it is obviously in the interests of both applicants and the organisation. The applicant knows where to go, and the organisation directs requests into the hands of those best placed to answer them properly. If there […]

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Otherwise responsible

Last week, the Information Commissioner issued a civil monetary penalty on Direct Assist Limited, a TPS-busting personal injury firm. As Direct Assist has been wound up by HMRC, all this means is that the ICO has added itself to Direct Assist’s list of creditors and the CMP will never be paid. It turns out the […]

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Concerns

At the end of July, the Information Commissioner issued a Civil Monetary Penalty on Think W3, an online travel company. Think W3 had flawed security and audit processes, and when a hacker gained access to Think W3’s customer data via a subsidiary company, the ICO (I think reasonably) concluded that the flawed framework was to blame. Think […]

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